ON BOOST: 2016 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe and Convertible arrive in Australia next May, with the 427kW Turbo S Coupe hitting 100kmh in 2.9-seconds.
ON BOOST: 2016 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe and Convertible arrive in Australia next May, with the 427kW Turbo S Coupe hitting 100kmh in 2.9-seconds.

New Porsche 911 Turbos go ballistic

LET'S talk Porsche 911s and turbocharging.

In case you'd not heard, the standard naturally-aspirated 911 models - the Carrera and Carrera S - are now turbocharged as part of Porsche's "991.II" updates, and the purists' feathers have been firmly ruffled, much like they were in 1997 when the dear old air cooled 911 engines became water cooled.

So with these entry-level 911s now turbocharged, what does it all mean for the boosted daddies of the range, the 911 Turbos? More power, of course, and performance figures even more bonkers than the current models they'll replace in May next year.

So even though the Carreras will also be turbos - that is, turbocharged - they won't be "Turbos". Confused? Not to worry, sit back and enjoy some happy numbers.

2016 Porsche Turbo. Photo: Contributed.
2016 Porsche Turbo. Photo: Contributed.

Both the 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S will boast 15kW more power over the current crop, the bi-turbo six-cylinder 3.8-litres producing 397kW in the former and 427kW in the latter. How? There are larger compressors for the new turbos, modified inlet ports, new injection nozzles and higher fuel pressure.

Performance figures are as shattering as expected. Three seconds' flat to 100kmh for the Turbo in Coupe form and 2.9-seconds the Turbo S Coupe. Cabriolet variants are also available, and don't expect these rapid drop-tops to laze behind too much in the acceleration stakes.

Top speeds are also rather silly. Headline is the Turbo S Coupe with 330kmh - that's 205mph if you like old money - while the Turbo runs out of guts at 320kmh. For the record, that's 12kmh and 5kmh faster than before, respectively.

2016 Porsche Turbo. Photo: Contributed.
2016 Porsche Turbo. Photo: Contributed.

And as is the trend these days, fuel economy figures somehow still go down as performance goes up. Coupe cars drink 9.1-litres/100km and cabrios 9.3-litres/100km, representing a drop of 0.6-litres for all versions thanks to advances in engine management and revised gear change mappings.

Okay, now some less happy numbers in case you were jotting a 911 Turbo down on the Christmas shopping list.

When they land down under in May next year you'll be asked to produce $384,900 for a 911 Turbo, $406,400 for a Turbo Cabriolet, $456,500 a Turbo S and $478,000 a Turbo S Cabriolet.

2016 Porsche Turbo. Photo: Contributed.
2016 Porsche Turbo. Photo: Contributed.

So prices are up over current Turbos but you do get more goodies. The Sport Chrono Package comes as standard, infotainment is enhanced, there's a new 918 Spyder-esque GT sport steering wheel and a less nannying Porsche Stability Management Sport Mode, which allows more sideways track fun tolerance without the need to completely remove the safety nets.

Exterior visual changes are relatively minor, with the revised front end receiving different slim twin LED lights and more air vents, there are new 20-inch wheels, new door handles, 3D rear lights and a different rear lid grille and exhaust exits.

The new Turbos will be revealed in the metal at the Detroit Auto Show in early January. Boost lovers, get saving now.

2016 Porsche Turbo. Photo: Contributed.
2016 Porsche Turbo. Photo: Contributed.

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