FIRST-HAND LOOK: Barenbrug staff with visitors at one of this week’s field days at the J Bjelke-Petersen Research Facility. Photo: Laura Blackmore
FIRST-HAND LOOK: Barenbrug staff with visitors at one of this week’s field days at the J Bjelke-Petersen Research Facility. Photo: Laura Blackmore

Ag business sets up base at South Burnett facility

ONE of Australia’s leading seed businesses has confirmed it will make the South Burnett home for the next few years.

Barenbrug, formerly known as Heritage Seeds, ran workshops at its South Burnett base at the J Bjelke-Petersen Research Facility this week to give people a look at some of their products onsite.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, the seed-producing company invited guests to learn about the extension and developmental work being undertaken at the facility, as well as their range of tropical grass and legume species.

Barenbrug territory manager for Southeast Queensland and the Burnett, Arthur Salisbury, said it was always good to give people a close-up look at their products.

Barenbrug territory manager for Southeast Queensland and Burnett Arthur Salisbury with research agronomist Ben Vercoe at the Kingaroy research facility. Photo: Laura Blackmore
Barenbrug territory manager for Southeast Queensland and Burnett Arthur Salisbury with research agronomist Ben Vercoe at the Kingaroy research facility. Photo: Laura Blackmore

“The idea for this site here at Kingaroy is to have resellers and industry people as well as the growers and users to check out our offerings in the flesh,” Mr Salisbury said.

“We have our whole sales team here onsite and they have talked about systems and different products that have a different fit.

“We have received great feedback from everyone who has attended the tours.”

Mr Salisbury said it was important to continue to educate the market as products were always being adapted.

“We are trying to improve out varieties and there are mostly tropical varieties here, which are well adapted to Kingaroy,” Mr Salisbury said.

“Some of the older varieties of grass are being replaced by newer varieties as time moves on, particularly rhodes grasses.

“We have a lot of rhodes grass here, which are bred for pure purposes of dry or irrigated land and makes lovely hay.

Barenbrug research agronomist Ben Vercoe takes visitors on a tour at J Bjelke-Petersen Research Facility this week. Photo: Laura Blackmore
Barenbrug research agronomist Ben Vercoe takes visitors on a tour at J Bjelke-Petersen Research Facility this week. Photo: Laura Blackmore

“You would be surprised how many Queenslanders grow it for hay.

“Hay has been so expensive for past three or four years in the dry drought, so rhodes grass is pretty tough and farmers are more inclined to grow it because it doesn’t need a lot of water.”

Research agronomist Ben Vercoe said the team hoped to host more field day events in the region.

“We are working towards having another one in the coming spring,” Mr Vercoe said.

“Hopefully we will have a winter crop sweet by then and show off our tropical produce.

“We are always open for someone to give us a call though – I am here at least once a week and Arthur is floating around the region.”

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