WASTE PIONEERS: Steve Burroughs, Scott Heyes and Andrew Beckett outside the facility that could potentially become Cherbourg's new recycling plant. Photo: Louise Cheer / South Burnett Times
WASTE PIONEERS: Steve Burroughs, Scott Heyes and Andrew Beckett outside the facility that could potentially become Cherbourg's new recycling plant. Photo: Louise Cheer / South Burnett Times Louise Cheer

Cherbourg pushes for recycling plant

CHERBOURG council have led the South Burnett in the way of recycling for the past two years, but increased demand on the plant now has them pushing for a much-needed upgrade.  

As part of the state government's Building our Regions Infrastructure Fund, Cherbourg's request is now one of 63 projects short listed.  

The next stage is highly competitive and applications undergo rigorous assessment by the Department of State Development and a committee of senior executives.  

The plant has been in operation for two years and is the only form of major recycling available in the South Burnett.   

Primarily a service for Cherbourg, the plant has expanded to make collections from Murgon businesses, Tarong Power Station as well as take kerbside waste from Gympie shire.   

Cherbourg Recycling Plant manager Andrew Beckett said the increased load had placed significant pressure on the plant.   

"The problem is we can't process the full amount due to the lack of infrastructure we have and as the population grows, this need will be greater," Mr Beckett said.  

"We're really asking for this support because it's a positive project that can impact everyone in this region."  

The plant has reduced landfill capacity at Cherbourg since its inception, which Mr Beckett saw as a significant regional problem moving forward.

He said 80% of household waste across the globe was recyclable and the region as an entirety trailed behind recycling efforts across the country.  

"It's common knowledge landfill doesn't last forever," Mr Beckett said.  

"The obvious first benefit of recycling creates the longevity of the landfill sites as well as reducing the cost of having to invest in added landfill sites going into the future.   

"We are well behind the eight ball in terms of technology and process."  

Despite the lack of a recycling movement in the region, Mr Beckett said he hoped the initiative in Cherbourg would inspire future development.   

"There are a lot of people who support this project and I see it as an opportunity to solve a regional problem in regards to waste," he said.  

"I believe we have an important part to play on the impact our community has on the environment."    

 

Recycling option for South Burnett 

KERBSIDE recycling could save ratepayers' hard-earned cash in the long run and extend the life of Kingaroy's current landfill site.  

Mayor Keith Campbell has said while recycling was supported within the community, ratepayers didn't want to pay an extra $2 per week for the service.  

But Environment and Waste manager Craig Patch insists the investment would save money long term, extending the life of Kingaroy's dump by up to a decade.  

Mr Patch said the site would be defunct in 12 years, but recycling would delay the need to build another facility.  

"We need to plan for the future, a large super tip or to cart waste, the infrastructure costs are quite significant," he said.   

"Like anything it's going to come at a price, but it will be saving ratepayers in the long term."  

Recycling for the region is still on the agenda and could be a possibility within four years.  

Council opted against recycling in 2014 after surveying the community.    

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