REPORTED TO POLICE: A Mount Perry couple were shocked when police visited their property to check if they were adhering to social distancing rules. Picture: Alex Geddes
REPORTED TO POLICE: A Mount Perry couple were shocked when police visited their property to check if they were adhering to social distancing rules. Picture: Alex Geddes

Couple reported to police for camping on own property

A MOUNT Perry couple were in disbelief when they were reported to police for camping on their own property.

The couple and fellow residents staying at their address, had to prove to police they lived at the property to escape heavy COVID-19 fines.

Police soon discovered they had been following strict self-isolation laws as they share their 128-acre property with their daughter who is an essential worker.

Alex Geddes, 64, said he was approached by police last Wednesday, April 8 after complaints were made.

"We've got two road frontages on our property, so there's access to both sides," Mr Geddes said.

"We moved over here because our daughter works out at the mines in a high-risk area dealing with visiting contractors all the time."

Mr Geddes has had heart problems in the past, and his wife suffers from immune system difficulties, putting them both in the high-risk category for coronavirus.

They're living in a caravan on their property alongside four other adults and three children in separate motor homes and tents.

The other residents have been there for several months, and have since changed their home address to the Mount Perry property.

The adults and children suffer from diabetes, respiratory issues and similar health problems, and have been adhering to the isolation laws set out by the state and federal governments.

"We were a bit upset when they came, we just couldn't believe it," Mr Geddes said.

"All of the people here have changed their addresses since they've been here for months.

"The police even checked our licences to confirm it."

The incident left Mr Geddes wondering what would happen to those offering their properties for camping during these uncertain times.

"We've seen properties on Facebook offering camping since there is nowhere else to go," Mr Geddes said.

"I'm just wondering what would've happened if we did the same, and offered it to visitors."

Mr Geddes is still gobsmacked about the police visit, since the family and friends all abide by the travel restrictions, only heading into town for the bare essentials.

"We go in probably every two to three weeks because we're feeding plenty of people here," he said.

"All the social distancing rules are being followed here - anytime we have a beer together at night we're all 1.5m apart."

The Queensland Police Service can issue on-the-spot fines of $1334 for individuals who fail to abide by the health directions set out by the state and federal governments.

They have issued 827 public health direction infringements as of Tuesday, April 14.


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