A dog which causes fear to a person or animal may be required to register as a dangerous dog.
A dog which causes fear to a person or animal may be required to register as a dangerous dog. Yuriy Zelenenkyy

EXPLAINED: What makes a dog 'dangerous'

A DOG which has attacked or caused fear could be declared as a dangerous or menacing dog.

A South Burnett Regional Council spokesperson said a dog could be declared as dangerous or menacing when it has attacked or acted in a way which caused fear to a person or another animal.

A dog may also be declared dangerous or menacing by another local government.

There are laws in place to reduce the risk of dog attacks, which is why the owner will have to comply with the special conditions listed in the legislation after it is registered as dangerous.

The State Government legislation requires if circumstances change and a dog needs to be registered as dangerous, there is a substantial process to be follow in the Animal Management (cats and dogs) Act.

Any South Burnett dog owners who have difficulty with the process are actively encouraged to engage with the council to ensure they comply with their legislative requirements.

A dog owner is given a notice advising them of their intentions to declare the dog as either menacing or dangerous and they are invited to provide the council with a written representation.

This allows the owners a natural justice to know what council is proposing and to provide their side of the story.

If the written representations are submitted they are taken into account in the decision making process.

If the decision to declare the dog as dangerous is made, the owner is given a formal notification of the decision.

They are also given a comprehensive list of what they are required to do in terms of keeping the dog and the forms required to launch an internal review of the decision.

They also have a further option of appealing the decisions through the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal.

When a dog is declared as dangerous or menacing the owner must:

  • Identify the dog by a microchip implant
  • Have the dog desexed (if declared dangerous)
  • Ensure the dog is always muzzled in a public place (only if declared dangerous)
  • If the dog is not at the place it is usually kept it must also be under effective control of an adult by holding it by an appropriate leash
  • Display a sign advising of a dangerous or menacing dog on the property.
  • Pay the relevant registration fee to keep the dog.
  • Maintain the dog's registration with Council at all times.
  • Provide and maintain a purpose built enclosure within the existing perimeter fencing to prevent the dog from escaping, or allow a child to climb into it, or requiring a member of the public to walk through the enclosure to access the front door.

For more information see the council website.

South Burnett

Update: Truck being cleared after Isis Highway inferno

premium_icon Update: Truck being cleared after Isis Highway inferno

Lucky escape after flames engulf load of hay on Isis Highway.

Well-known businessman begins 2020 election campaign

premium_icon Well-known businessman begins 2020 election campaign

'I am very happy with how my election campaign is progressing.'

Home care giving elderly freedom to choose independence

Home care giving elderly freedom to choose independence

'It's a companionship forged on care trust and respect.'