HOT TIPS: What to do if you find injured or dead wildlife

SOUTH Burnett wildlife experts have blamed the drought for the sudden influx of starving and dehydrated wildlife in our region that has lead them to be inundated with rescue calls.

Wildlife South Burnett wild life rescuer Colin Newson has given some advice for what to do if you find an injured or dead native animal here in the South Burnett.

He said this sudden influx was not normal for this time of year and the drought was to blame

1. Call Wildlife South Burnett

"Always look out for your safety and call us first," Mr Newson said.

"If it's about a snake or lizard then you should call Darryl Robinson from Nanango."

  • Wildlife Rescue South Burnett: 4168 2909
  • Darryl Robinson: 0498 177 734
  • Kingaroy RSPCA: 4162 5501

2. Koalas

"Koalas can be quite vicious," Mr Newson said.

"When we do a rescue we wear special gloves and they manage to bite us through those sometimes.

"This doesn't mean you shouldn't help them though. Just make sure you keep your distance until help arrives."

Wild life rescuers have been inundated with calls about starving, dehydrated, and injured native animals.
Wild life rescuers have been inundated with calls about starving, dehydrated, and injured native animals. Wild Life South Burnett

3. Kangaroos/wallabies/joeys

"If you find an injured joey always try to keep it warm," Mr Newson said.

"You can wrap them in a towel or t-shirt or anything. It's also a good idea to cover it's head lightly with the towel.

"Once you've covered it's head the joey will just go straight to sleep. Which will make it much easier to contain while you wait for help."

Mr Newson said if you find a grown kangaroo or wallaby to keep your distance.

"If it's injured call for help," he said.

"Then get close enough to put a towel over it's head. But don't get too close.

"It may hurt you because it's panicked and scared."

4. Bats

Mr Newson said in previous years the wildlife centre didn't do bat rescues, but reptile catcher Darryl Robinson did.

"But since there have been so many this year we now help too," Mr Newson said.

"We've been getting a lot of starved and dehydrated bats. It's unbelievable.

"To the extent that they're starting to try and eat from rose bushes or just anything sweet. This of course is very dangerous and I got a call just the other day about an injured bat stuck in a rose rush."

Mr Newson said to call for help right away if you find an injured or dead bat.

"No matter what you do don't touch them," he said.

"Keep an eye on them and put a damp towel over them if you can.

"This will keep the membranes moist so their wings aren't at risk of tearing.

"You can also put a washing basket over them to keep them contained."

South Burnett Wild Life Rescue have been inundated with calls of dehydrated, starved, and dead bats this week.
South Burnett Wild Life Rescue have been inundated with calls of dehydrated, starved, and dead bats this week. Kayleen England

5. Echidnas

"We've been getting a lot of calls from people finding echidnas in their yards," Mr Newson said.

"It's just because they're looking for water.

"It they're not injured and you don't have any dogs or cats then just leave them alone and they will move on."

Otherwise, Mr Newson said to call them for help.

"If you can pick them up without hurting them or yourself then please do," he said.

"Put them in a box or somewhere dark and cool.

"They are not vicious at all and will just roll up into a ball. Be weary of those spikes though."

Me Newson said to always call for help even if the echidna is dead because they could have a puggle (baby echidna) in their pouch.

6. Birds

Mr Newson said it's common for baby birds to fall out of their nests this time of year.

"If you can find the nest then just pop them back in," he said.

"The mother will look after a returned baby even after human contact.

"If you can't find the nest or the baby is injured then call us and keep it contained and warm."

7. Road kill

"If you hit wild life with your car always stop to check on it," Mr Newson said.

"You need to check if the animal is dead or not.

"If it is dead drag it off of the road and check for a baby. If they have a baby contain it and call for help."

If the animal isn't dead but is very badly injured Mr Newson said to call the police.

"Police can euthanize the animal and put it out of it's misery," he said.

"We don't have the license to. The best we can do is sedate it and then take it to the vets. Which is a bit of a process.

"You're better off getting the police to put them down as soon as possible. If you're not sure how bad the injury is you can call us and we'll talk you through it."

Mr Newson said if the animal was injured, but would make it, to call them for assistance.

South Burnett

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