With the rain returning Nanango Garden Club president Avis Klinck has been busy feeding and growing her diverse and colourful garden.
With the rain returning Nanango Garden Club president Avis Klinck has been busy feeding and growing her diverse and colourful garden. Barclay White

How does your garden grow?

GROWING up in rural Surrey in England, as a child she would follow her father around in the garden.

"I used to help my daddy in the garden when I was very young," Ms Klinck said.

"I much preferred being outside with my dad than helping inside with my mum."

For her father, his garden served a practical purpose as well as a personal one.

During the Second World War he would grow many vegetables and fruit.

In the time of rationing, the extra food helped the family.

"He used to grow it all himself, his own veggies. Even after the war we very rarely bought anything like that because we grew it ourselves."

Moving to Australia as an adult, she brought the love of gardening with her and now spends at least a few hours each day tending to her garden.

A combination of colour and a variety of flowers, she also follows her father's practicality by growing many herbs and vegetables and reusing scraps for composting.

A free-flowing theme in her garden, she grows whatever she feels like, but always makes sure there are plenty of colours.

"I do like a little bit of everything," she said.

She plans to have something blooming and colourful all year round and plants accordingly.

With diverse flowers ranging from roses and geraniums to succulents and cacti, she hopes to have a large variety for whenever someone is wandering through the garden beds.

The past year has been tough on the garden, and many plants have been lost with others struggling to survive during the dry heat.

"We did lose a lot of plants in the drought.

"I lost a lot of my strawberry plants and a lot of the veggies too. The sun would just burn them."

But she made sure she had lots of plants that would survive the drought and used water from her three tanks to keep many of the more demanding plants alive.

Cacti and succulents, which make up a large amount of her garden, can survive for longer than most plants during a drought.

And to keep the garden colourful, many flowering plants, like the nodding violets, will bloom all year round and without much water.

But with the rain coming again the grass is looking green, the flowers are happy and the whole garden is once again looking alive.

A lot of the plants in her garden come from cuttings from friends.

"A lot of what is in here is from people in the garden club. That's what we like doing," she said.

And she has more plans for her precious garden.

Ms Klinck is planning on planting some new flowers, but not before jetting off to England for six weeks.

She plans to visit many gardens, including the famous Chelsea Flower Show in the hope of maybe getting some more ideas for her own garden. But until then she will be hard at work in her own green oasis and taking plenty of photos to show her English relatives what she can grow down under.

"It's very peaceful in this garden," Ms Klinck said. "I like to hear the birds and the bees buzzing about."

For anyone interested the Nanango Garden Club meets on the first Thursday of each month at 10am in a different member's garden.

Call Avis Klinck on 4163 2313.

South Burnett

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