It may be pleasantly warm this week, but the rain is returning. Picture: Bureau of Meteorology
It may be pleasantly warm this week, but the rain is returning. Picture: Bureau of Meteorology

The storms just won’t let up

FEROCIOUS storms slammed into Queensland on Sunday, cancelling outdoor events, grounding planes and delivering huge hailstones.

Thunderstorms will persist in inland areas of central and southeast Queensland today, while on the horizon a new rain event has been spied.

Although it's early days, this new system, currently bubbling off the Western Australian coast, has the hallmarks of this weekend's tempestuous weather.

But before that arrives get ready for temperatures way above normal, heatwaves in some parts and even areas of catastrophic fire danger and "uncontrollable" bushfires.

"Yesterday, we had wild thunderstorms that spread right cross southeast Queensland," said Sky News Weather meteorologist Rob Sharpe.

Tyler Denver and Jessica Ellis look at the large tree that fell in Toowoomba’s Bell Street Mall. Storm damage. Photo Bev Lacey
Tyler Denver and Jessica Ellis look at the large tree that fell in Toowoomba’s Bell Street Mall. Storm damage. Photo Bev Lacey

At Greenbank, a defence firing range just south of Brisbane, 39mm of rain pelted down as the dark clouds rolled in. On the Gold Coast, Coolangatta fared worse, recording more than 47mm, much of that falling in just one hour.

That caused the cancellation of super car race the GC600 as Surfers Paradise became a washout.

Over the weekend, around 300,000 forks of lightning struck NSW which was plagued by the same system.

On Monday, more thunderstorms could hit Brisbane in the afternoon but they are not likely to be as angry as the storms seen in recent days.

Mr Sharpe said the intensity of the storms was due to a rotating upper level cold pool - a low-pressure system that spun and headed straight for Brisbane and the Gold Coast. And the system now off the west coast of WA looks similar, he said.

"The rain event is going to be due to an upper level cold pool. The low pressure system starts to form on Friday with heavy falls in Central Australia."

However, Mr Sharpe said there were still "huge amounts of uncertainty" as to how strong the system would be or even where it would head. The forecast will become clearer later in the week.

One model, he said, had the rain making a beeline for southern parts of NSW and Victoria.

"But before see that rainfall, we're going to see very warm temperatures," he said.

AROUND THE CAPITALS THIS WEEK

Away from the remaining storms, it's going to be a generally fine few days, albeit with some cloud and the possibility of showers here and there.

Brisbane will see highs approaching 30C this week with some cloud but little in the way of rain.

In Sydney a high of 23C will rise to 28C on a windy Tuesday and then down again to around 20-22C for Wednesday and Thursday.

A lovely week in Canberra with a high of 29C on Tuesday.

Melbourne will be sunny on Monday with a high of 28C dropping back to 20C on Tuesday. Warrnambool, in the state's west, will see the mercury push 10C above average on Monday.

A high of 24C in Hobart on Monday then dips to as low as 16C on Wednesday with possible showers on Tuesday.

Adelaide will hit 30C on Monday but will be a full 11C chillier on Tuesday as a cool change comes through. Temperatures will steadily rise again towards the weekend.

Temperatures in Perth will be around the 20-22C mark for most of the week with showers on the southern costal fringe.

But further north and across inland areas it's going to be incredibly hot.

Heatwaves have been forecast for some northern parts of Australia. Picture: Bureau of Meteorology
Heatwaves have been forecast for some northern parts of Australia. Picture: Bureau of Meteorology

Port Hedland could crack 40C on both Monday and Tuesday, with reliably toasty Marble Bar stretching to 43C.

"Intense winds across the interior are likely to lead to catastrophic fire danger - that's the highest fire level danger you can experience," Mr Sharpe said.

"Bushfires will form very fast and be completely uncontrollable. Fire threat then shifts east with the heat focusing on Central Australia and parts of South Australia."

The fires, however, are likely to be in very remote areas.

Severe and extreme heatwaves have also been forecast for the far north of the Northern Territory, near Darwin, and the Cape York Peninsula in Queensland. The mercury will likely top out at 35C most days this week in Darwin.

Hail carpets the ground at Samford Valley near Brisbane. Picture: Mark Sandford
Hail carpets the ground at Samford Valley near Brisbane. Picture: Mark Sandford

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