WEARING RED: Shayla Cridge, Tye Smith, Lucy Needer, Rasiahly Tom, Tayalah Smith, and Gordon Hume from year 5/6 at Kingaroy State School.
WEARING RED: Shayla Cridge, Tye Smith, Lucy Needer, Rasiahly Tom, Tayalah Smith, and Gordon Hume from year 5/6 at Kingaroy State School.

Learning about ‘stranger danger’ on Day for Daniel

KINGAROY State School was a sea of red as students and teachers banded together to raise awareness of stranger danger for this year’s Day for Daniel.

Kingaroy State School deputy principal Jason Wyeth said it was an important day of the year.

“We’ve been running activities in the classroom along with the wearing red imitative,” he said.

“The day has been running here for a number of years now. A lot of our teachers, parents, and students are really supportive of it.

“It’s important to keep talking about stranger danger and staying safe. Whether you’re in a small country town or the big city, it doesn’t matter.”

Just last week Kingaroy State School were lucky enough to have the Morcombes visit and teach them even more about stranger danger.

“It was great having them here to talk through everything with the kids,” Mr Wyeth said.

“It’s also a part of our curriculum.

“And we also encourage a lot of those one-off conversations. If students have questions they should be asking teachers, parents or anyone they trust.”

Kingaroy State School teachers on day for Daniel: Adam Carrigan, Sam Andison, Julia Thomas, Trish Bemslie, Michelle Dempster, Leanne Montgomery, Tenille Laherty, Delina Kendall, Gabi Lucas, and Alana Brazier.
Kingaroy State School teachers on day for Daniel: Adam Carrigan, Sam Andison, Julia Thomas, Trish Bemslie, Michelle Dempster, Leanne Montgomery, Tenille Laherty, Delina Kendall, Gabi Lucas, and Alana Brazier.

Mr Wyeth said the Daniel Morcombe curriculum had focused on what to do about stranger danger, and who students could trust.

“There’s a big focus on who they can go to and report any incidents to,” he said.

“So usually five people they trust and can go to in order to feel safe.

“We are also always saying if they see someone in the school grounds who they don’t know to report it to someone right away.”

Mr Wyeth said this day was particularly important for the younger students.

“So then by the time they get older they’re much more aware and can look out for the younger years,” he said.

“Overall it’s a really important part of our curriculum and a day we will probably keep participating in.”

South Burnett

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