In November Australia Zoo issued a warning that as weather warmed up snakes would become increasingly active. Nick Kuyper, Head of Reptiles at Australia Zoo said at the time snakes did an incredible service in maintaining ecosystems by keeping rodent numbers down. With vast areas if grasslands and forests being consumed for development snakes have had to adapt to survive in urbanised environments
In November Australia Zoo issued a warning that as weather warmed up snakes would become increasingly active. Nick Kuyper, Head of Reptiles at Australia Zoo said at the time snakes did an incredible service in maintaining ecosystems by keeping rodent numbers down. With vast areas if grasslands and forests being consumed for development snakes have had to adapt to survive in urbanised environments

'Wild' snake bites Australia Zoo staff member

UPDATE: An Australia Zoo spokesman says a staff member was "tagged" by a wild snake in an off-display area of the zoo.

"While brown tree snakes are mildly venomous, they are not generally considered dangerous," he said.

"As a precaution, the staff member was taken to the hospital.

"The staff member, and snake, are both doing fine."

EARLIER: A MAN has been taken to Sunshine Coast University Hospital this morning after an incident at Australia Zoo.

Queensland Ambulance Service has confirmed it was called to the zoo about 8.30am after reports that a 27-year-old male had been bitten by a snake.

A QAS spokesman said the patient had been taken to the hospital in a stable condition.

It was thought the man was a member of the Australia Zoo staff, but this has yet to be confirmed.

Questions have been put to Australia Zoo about the incident.

On January 2, 2017, a female zoo visitor in her mid-20s was bitten by green tree snake after standing on it in the zoo's wetland area.

"This is the only time a guest has been bitten by a snake at Australia Zoo in our 46-year history," a zoo spokesman said at the time.

"The snake was identified as a green tree snake, which are a common occurrence in the wetlands, as it is the perfect environment for their favourite food, frogs.

"While green tree snakes are not venomous, we followed first aid protocol and the guest was taken to the hospital.

"Luckily, the guest had seen our Wildlife Warriors Show and was familiar with snake bite first aid."

A week later, on January 9, 2017, another female zoo visitor was also bitten by what was confirmed to be a green tree snake.


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