Kingaroy product Holly Ferling was back on home soild teaching the next genenration. Photo/Tristan Evert
Kingaroy product Holly Ferling was back on home soild teaching the next genenration. Photo/Tristan Evert

MASTERCLASS: Cricket star teaching the next generation

KINGAROY product Holly Ferling was back on home soil running an all female cricket at the Nanango Cricket Club.

After rising through the ranks of the male dominated South Burnett competition, Ferling was excited to see the number of players and the high level of skill among the regions female cricketers.

She said playing against the boys and the men shaped the cricketer she became.

“In all honesty, the South Burnett comp is the reason I am where I am today,” Ferling said.

“I loved playing against the blokes, it definitely taught me if I bowl in the right area I take wickets and when I don’t I get hit.

“Playing boys and men's cricket hardened me, it me made know my game more and more.”

Over two days last week, Queensland Cricket ran two all-female clinics in Nanango with 32 girls registering.

Holly Ferling teaching bowling technique in Nanango. Photo/Tristan Evert
Holly Ferling teaching bowling technique in Nanango. Photo/Tristan Evert

The clinics had the help of Ferling and former Murgon player and current Brisbane Heat cricketer Courtney Sippel.

The two-day program taught players the ins and outs of cricket, bowling and batting technique as well as fielding.

Ferling said female participation is growing year by year.

“Female participation in cricket is growing enormously, it’s one of the largest increasing year on year sport for girls, which is awesome,” she said.

“I think the visibility of the WBBL on TV and the Australian women’s team are now household names, all those things culminate together.

“When I first started to play 13 years ago, I had no idea girls played cricket or even the years beyond that, I had no idea the pathway for girls’ cricket.

“Now we have these clinics with a lot of girls knowing this is a pathway for them and just starting to love the game.”

Nanango cricketer firing one down the nets. Photo/Tristan Evert
Nanango cricketer firing one down the nets. Photo/Tristan Evert

The WBBL was fortunate enough to resume this year with players forced into a bubble.

Ferling said it was tough, however her team handled it well.

“We were only allowed to go to training, games, a walk in the park and then we just had to stay at our hotel.

“It was challenging, but our team really handled it well.

“A lot of us took the mindset that cricket would come back at some point and when it does we needed to be ready.

“Our training was very different it was kind of like an extended pre-season because the tournament was pushed back.”

Ferling is now preparing for a big season with the QLD Fire, which will start on January 15 and will consist of eight one dayers.

Ferling said her team will be pushing to take out the competition in 2021.

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