FILE PHOTO - Prince Harry, Duke And Meghan, Duchess Of Sussex Announce They Are To Step Back As Senior Royals Members Of The Royal Family Attend Events To Mark The Centenary Of The RAF
FILE PHOTO - Prince Harry, Duke And Meghan, Duchess Of Sussex Announce They Are To Step Back As Senior Royals Members Of The Royal Family Attend Events To Mark The Centenary Of The RAF

Meghan’s explosive claims ‘distressing’ for Queen, royals

Meghan Markle's explosive court claims that she felt "unprotected" by the royal family could be "disturbing reading" for the Queen, a royal expert has claimed.

Royal reporter Russell Myers told Good Morning Britain that senior members of the royal family will be "very distressed" over claims in court documents that Meghan felt the "institution of the royal family" failed to protect her while she was pregnant with Archie.

The situation is "very, very sad indeed", Mr Myers said on British TV, adding that the royal family will likely be upset by the court submissions being made public.

"They're all also disturbing readings for the royal family. They will be really, really distressed," he said.

"These are obviously a part of a lot of claims that Meghan wants to air in public as part of her spectacular fallout with the royals since they've left for the US."

Mr Myers said the upcoming release of books about Meghan, Prince Harry and Prince William will also deepen the rift in the family.

Mr Myers also stated that he had looked back on the Queen's statement when Prince Harry and Meghan left stepped down as senior royals in January.

"At the time, and certainly reading back on them no, they are very, very heartfelt.

"The Queen mentions family, how they took Meghan into the heart of the family and how she had been so impressed with her.

"And certainly these claims that she felt unprotected, especially when pregnant, will be very, very distressing to hear for the Queen, Philip, Charles, Kate and William," he said.

 

 

 

MEGHAN'S EXPLOSIVE CLAIMS AGAINST ROYALS

On Wednesday, Meghan claimed she was left "unprotected" by the royal family when she endured negative media coverage while she was pregnant, according to documents in a high stakes legal battle.

The details of the court battle against a British newspaper over an article about a letter she sent to her father have overshadowed an emotional message from Prince Harry about racism.

The Duke of Sussex, 35, delivered a heartfelt video message that was played at The Diana Awards, which were named in honour of his mother the late Princess of Wales, who would have been 59 on Wednesday.

"My wife said recently that our generation and the ones before us haven't done enough to right the wrongs of the past," Prince Harry said.

"I too, am sorry. Sorry that we haven't got the world to the place that you deserve it to be."

The couple have supported the Black Lives Matter campaign, and put their names behind a campaign demanding companies boycott Facebook and Instagram advertising until they crack down on hate speech.

"Institutional racism has no place in our societies, yet it is still endemic," Prince Harry added.

"Unconscious bias must be acknowledged without blame, to create a better world for all of you."

Princess Diana with Prince Harry. Picture: Getty Images
Princess Diana with Prince Harry. Picture: Getty Images

'UNPROTECTED': MEGHAN'S EXPLOSIVE CLAIMS

It came as the Duchess of Sussex, 38, revealed in court documents the identities of her friends who were quoted in a magazine article at the centre of a legal dispute.

Meghan claimed that her friends had spoken out because she was left "unprotected" by the royal family while she was pregnant.

She has named the five sources who spoke to People magazine in the United States, which revealed the existence of a letter she sent to her father Thomas Markle, 75.

The Mail on Sunday printed a story based on the letter a week later, which Meghan claims was a breach of privacy and has launched a suit in Britain's High Court.

The documents released on Thursday morning Australian time also claim that Prince Harry and Meghan's royal wedding generated $1.8 billion in tourism for the UK, as Meghan defended the cost of the nuptials.

 

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have relocated to the US. Picture: Getty Images
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have relocated to the US. Picture: Getty Images

"Any public costs incurred for the wedding were solely for security and crowd control to protect members of the public, as deemed necessary by Thames Valley Police and the Metropolitan Police," the court submission stated.

Meghan Markle found life in the royal spotlight too much. Picture: Getty Images
Meghan Markle found life in the royal spotlight too much. Picture: Getty Images

She also claimed she was frustrated that she could not earn her own money like Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie, the children of the disgraced Prince Andrew.

The People article, published in February 2019, came amid a flood of negative headlines about the Duchess of Sussex, including claims that she had made Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, cry during a dress fitting for Princess Charlotte.

Meghan claimed in court papers that she felt "tremendous emotional distress" by the negative reports, and her friends had said she had been "silenced" by the royal family.

She also claimed that she felt the royal family had left her "unprotected."

 

 

 

 

Meghan denied that she had authorised her friends to speak to the magazine, which will be a key part of the Mail on Sunday's defence, with their lawyers arguing she had put it in the public domain.

Her father has vowed to testify against Meghan in court if called, in what would be an extraordinary session in the witness box.

Meghan could also potentially be called as a witness, which would generate intense world media interest.

The royal family have sued successfully for breach of privacy before, which is considered a lower legal bar than defamation.

The couple quit the royal family earlier this year, with a Commonwealth Day service at Westminster Abbey their last official royal engagement.

They have moved to Los Angeles, California, where they have volunteered for charities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Originally published as Meghan's explosive claims 'distressing' for Queen, royals


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