YOUNG HANDLER: Michael Hunter (left) says his son Mitchell (right) has a bright future in the agriculture industry. Photo Kate Darvall/ South Burnett Times
YOUNG HANDLER: Michael Hunter (left) says his son Mitchell (right) has a bright future in the agriculture industry. Photo Kate Darvall/ South Burnett Times Kate Darvall

Mitchell Hunter is mustering up to the big stage

YOUNG Mitchell Hunter has passion for the agricultural industry coursing through his veins.

And his passion is backed up by talent.

The 15-year-old cleaned up at this month's Brahmousin Cattle School, winning first place in the young handlers' award.

He was also crowned reserve champion in the young parade, and won the Peter Shelton Memorial Shield.

At just 15, Mitchell said he already found the secret to cattle handling.

"Just a lot of time and patience and effort," he said.

Mitchell said his success all came down to having a good relationship with the cattle.

"You've got to get them to trust you because their instinct is to run, and we don't want them to run," he said.

"Let them know you're not trying to hurt them."

Mitchell's father Michael Hunter said his son's ability with cattle was almost instinctive.

But, he said, it took hard work to get where he was.

"I've explained to him nothing's going to be given to him on a silver platter, so if he wants something you've got to work hard to get it," Mr Hunter said.

"But it's certainly in his blood."

YOUNG HANDLER: Michael Hunter (left) says his son Mitchell (right) has a bright future in the agriculture industry. Photo Kate Darvall/ South Burnett Times
YOUNG HANDLER: Michael Hunter (left) says his son Mitchell (right) has a bright future in the agriculture industry. Photo Kate Darvall/ South Burnett Times Kate Darvall

In the wake of his success at the Brahmousin Cattle School last weekend, Mr Hunter said there was no time to rest.

He said Mitchell was working hard towards the World Brahman Congress in Rockhampton in May.

"That's the next big one for him," he said.

Mitchell said it would require him to keep his head down and work hard with the cattle in the lead-up to the show.

"Before school, after school and all day on the weekends," he said.

Mitchell said preparation also required some unusual methods.

"We put the radio on for them, because when you're at shows they have really loud speakers," he said.

"And if you've never heard it before they can go schiz."

Mitchell said the World Brahman Congress would be on a bigger stage, with higher expectations.

"It's going to be like a big meeting for everyone across the world with brahmans," he said.

"It will be interesting."

Mitchell said he planned to take four head of cattle up to Rockhampton for the congress in May.

"It will be good to see how they match up to other brahmans," he said.

South Burnett

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