Kumbia and Wooroolin State School students released hundreds of red balloons into the air after a presentation on personal safety from the Morcombes.
Kumbia and Wooroolin State School students released hundreds of red balloons into the air after a presentation on personal safety from the Morcombes. Helen Spelitis

New message for youngsters

IT'S been more than 10 years since Daniel Morcombe was abducted from a bus stop on the Sunshine Coast in December 2003.

And while his parents, Bruce and Denise, have continued travelling the state teaching children about personal safety their message has changed.

"We see online safety as being the largest danger for students of this generation," Mr Morcombe said.

At Kumbia State School on Friday Mr Morcombe urged about 100 students from Kumbia and Wooroolin schools to delete anyone off their Facebook account they didn't know.

"They want to be popular, and have as many friends as possible," he said.

"As much as there is the urge to do that (accept friend requests from strangers) it's not the right thing to do. So we ask kids to delete them."

He said society had changed in the past few years with a focus on social media, and making children aware of the important message that people can and do lie online.

"Don't put photos of your uniforms, or your home address, your mobile number on your Facebook page," Mr Morcombe told the students.

"Delete people you don't know - it's not a popularity contest."

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