Man who repeatedly raped woman in park to stay in jail

NOOSA rapist Kym Spoehr remains a "serious danger to the community" and will stay behind bars indefinitely.

The 63-year-old was sent to prison in 2003 for 14 years after he pleaded guilty to repeatedly raping a woman he held prisoner overnight in Noosa National Park on Christmas Day in 2001.

The Japanese woman, a 29 year old on a working visa, had asked for directions from Spoehr and was then attacked with a piece of wood before becoming his captive.

The drifter fled the region shortly after he released the woman and was eventually found in the Coffs Harbour region.

Spoehr has a criminal history in four states from 1968 on various minor offences including some property offences, and one wilful exposure offence in Western Australia in 1980.

He has served the full sentence but under Queensland's dangerous prisoner laws, the Attorney-General sought to extend Spoehr's detention so he could complete a sex offender program or undergo intensive psychological therapy.

Spoehr, who argued his case from the Maryborough Correctional Centre, told Brisbane Supreme Court earlier this month he should be released from prison despite refusing to take part in such programs.

In a judgment delivered on Friday, Justice Peter Flanagan said he could not properly identify the re-offending risk when so little is known about what triggered Spoehr's offending.

"I accept therefore that the Attorney-General has satisfied the court that adequate protection of the community cannot be reasonably and practicably managed by the proposed supervision order," he said.

"(Spoehr's) real risk of committing a further sexual offence would be better understood and assessed if he was to first undertake one on one psychological counselling and participate in an appropriate sexual offenders program prior to his release on a supervision order."

- APN NEWSDESK


Ants defeat Stags in pink

Ants defeat Stags in pink

The Red Ants defeated the Stags on Saturday.

Calls to prevent youth suicide

Calls to prevent youth suicide

Australia needs a specific, youth suicide prevention strategy.

Wondai forfeit for second week

Wondai forfeit for second week

Wondai were forced to forfeit for the second consecutive week

Local Partners