Nurses Marcia Hunt, Kathy Anning, and Barbara Milne will be visiting several towns in the South Burnett this month, providing women in regional areas will free healthcare. File Photo.
Nurses Marcia Hunt, Kathy Anning, and Barbara Milne will be visiting several towns in the South Burnett this month, providing women in regional areas will free healthcare. File Photo.

Nurses hit the road, bringing healthcare to Burnett women

DARLING Downs Health mobile women’s health nurses have hit the road, on a mission to provide free healthcare to local ladies in the South Burnett.

Nurses Barbara Milne, Kathy Anning and Marcia Hunt, will be providing a range of services to women is regional areas, including cervical screening tests, breast awareness, sexual health testing, and advice for issues such as continence, menopause, family planning, contraception and general wellbeing.

According to a report released by the National Rural Health alliance, women’s health is particularly important because it is a determinant of the health and wellbeing of their children and their communities.

There are major inequalities in the health of women living in rural or remote areas, since women who live in these areas are less likely to obtain health care from medical specialists and more likely to rely on hospital care. This key difference has meant higher death rates for these women.

Kathy Anning, who covers the south-east region, said the mobile women’s health clinics are an easy, fuss-free way to ensure health tests are up-to-date.

“Our clinics are a great opportunity for women to seek help for anything that is concerning them,” she said.

In 2017, changes were made to the cervical screening program, with women now needing a cervical screening test every five years instead of a pap test every two years.

Ms Barbara Milne, who travels west from Dalby, to Taroom in the north, and to Texas in the south, said women are often prioritising the health of others resulting in their own health being sidelined.

“It’s really important for the women in our communities to prioritise their health and wellbeing, and make time for regular check-ups and tests,” she said.

Ms Marcia Hunt, who covers the north east region, said it’s important to get cervical screenings tests when they are due, as they are the best protection against cervical cancer.

“While the test is every five years, we really encourage women to book into our clinics if they have any concerns, or if something doesn’t feel right,” she said.

Upcoming clinics will be held at the following locations:

Dalby Hospital, October 8 and October 30. Phone 4669 0517

Clifton Medical Centre, October 13. Phone 4697 3097

Miles Hospital, October 14. Phone 4628 5600

Kingaroy Hospital, October 14. Phone 4162 9220

Stanthorpe Hospital, October 15. Phone 4683 3460

Chinchilla Hospital, October 16 and October 19. Phone 4662 8888

Esk Hospital, October 19. Phone 5424 4600

Proston Community Health, October 19. Phone 4168 9288

Goondiwindi Hospital, October 21. Phone 4578 2400

Yarraman Medical Centre, October 22. Phone 4163 8388

Oakey Hospital, October 28. Phone 4691 4888

Inglewood Community Health, October 29. Phone 4652 0777

South Burnett

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