DEVASTATED: Warren and Charmaine Osborne lost three sheep to a wild dog attack on July 17.
DEVASTATED: Warren and Charmaine Osborne lost three sheep to a wild dog attack on July 17. Tobi Loftus

Savage wild dog attack leads to questions

A HORRIFIC and savage feral dog attack on a lamb less than one month old has left a Nanango couple heartbroken.

Warren Osborne, whose property is about 2km from the Nanango CBD, said he woke up on Monday morning to the devastating sight.

"I woke up and went out tothe shed, normally I go and look for the sheep but I went to the shed first,” he said.

"My wife, Charmaine, came out to me and said what is that white thing over there in the paddock.

"I went over and it was just one of the lambs absolutely decimated. I found another sheep down there dead and I went around until I found two others badly chewed up.

"Two of the lambs have survived and the ram.”

Out of the seven sheep and lambs Warren and Charmaine owned, only four survived.

"We got the sheep around Christmas, they all had lambs in the last month,” Warren said.

"Before we got them we dog-fenced the place. We can't find where they got in.

"There are some very big paw prints around so they must be fair lumps of things.”

Warren said their neighbour's two 10-year-old daughters often came around to feed the lambs.

"The little lamb that was killed, the girls used to nurse it, it was the friendliest lamb out of them and now she's gone,” he said.

"Now their dad has to break the news to them. It will be devastating for them.”

The couple has been in the process of moving to Nanango since last year.

"We moved from Bundaberg as we lost everything in the 2013 floods,” Warren said.

"Instead of sticking around there and pick up our lives just to watch another flood come through, we decided to find a hill to live on.”

A South Burnett Regional Council spokesperson said they were aware of the situation.

"Council has provided advice on control options, offered the loan of wild dog traps and training in their use, provided details of local professional trappers and offered the loan of surveillance cameras,” the spokesperson said.

"In this case, because of the size of the land parcel and its close proximity to the urban area, 1080 baiting would not be a safe or appropriate control method to use.”

The spokesperson said in the 2016-17 financial year they had received about 20reports of wild dog incidents, about three of which occurred in areas surrounding Nanango.

"Reports of wild dog sightings and damage fluctuate depending on environmental conditions such as rainfall, with an increase in reports during calving (September/October) and wild dog breeding season (April/May),” they said.

The spokesperson said if anyone had concerns about wild dogs they should contact the council.

"Whilst coordinated 1080 baiting programs are an efficient and effective wild dog control method, in some cases other management options such as trapping and exclusion fencing may be more appropriate for your situation,” they said.

"All landholders have a legislative responsibility under the Biosecurity Act to control wild dogs on their property.”

South Burnett

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