Marion Darlington spins some wool in memory of Boondooma's early sheep grazing days.
Marion Darlington spins some wool in memory of Boondooma's early sheep grazing days. Tessa Mapstone

Spinning a Scottish yarn at Scots in the Bush

BOONDOOMA Homestead will forever be a part of Marion Darlington's life.

"I was the temporary caretaker here for four years," she said.

"Once you get Boondooma in your blood, you can't get it out of it.

"It's a special place."

Now a volunteer on the Boondooma Homestead Committee, Ms Darlington's task for Scots in the Bush was to man the registration desk, and she put her own spin on the job.

In between registering guests and answering questions, Ms Darlington sat at her spinning wheel and thought of the early days at Boondooma Station, settled by Scottish squatters Alexander and Robert Lawson.

"It was originally a sheep station, so you can imagine how many of the workmen's wives had wheels like this and spun the wool," she said.

"They knew sheep in Scotland and they knew sheep down south, but the flocks deteriorated by dingo, spear grass and scalp (a skin disease).

"The sheep were only farmed for the first 20 years, then they moved to cattle."

Ms Darlington, also a member of the Murgon Spinners and Weavers Group, was perfectly placed to bring wool back to Boondooma for the celebration of the station's Scottish origins.

South Burnett

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