SNAKING IN: Gayndah's Susie Capewell found this carpet python underneath her car bonnet on Saturday.
SNAKING IN: Gayndah's Susie Capewell found this carpet python underneath her car bonnet on Saturday.

Spring sees a surge in snake sightings

BURNETT residents have been keeping their eyes peeled this week after a six-foot snake was spotted in the centre of Gayndah.

Susie Capewell was alerted on Saturday that a carpet python had crawled up under her car, parked outside Gayndah Art Gallery, to seek refuge from the crows.

"He wasn't that happy to be shifted either," she said.

"Just be aware St Joey's people, he made his way into the bushes behind the toilet block at the back of the gallery and may be seeking shelter in the school grounds."

Mrs Capewell said a friend had also found a snake in their budgies' cage that morning, sans budgies.

A North Burnett snake catcher said he was not surprised that sightings are on the rise this week, and he expected a few more call-outs at this time of year.

"I still had snake call-outs all throughout winter but spring especially is when they start breeding," Buckley Snake Relocation Services' Andrew Buckley said.

"The males will be out travelling, searching for a mate, so it means you're more likely to see one now then you would at any other time."

"I found three green tree snakes in a roof recently, which is just not their norm, but because they were breeding it just changed up the way they would behave."

Mr Buckley said, regardless of a person's experience with snakes, they are a native animal and it's illegal to interfere.

"It's the same as any other protected species," he said.

"If you just spotted a snake in the middle of your yard, in most situations you can just keep your eye on the snake, keep a safe distance, let others know, and obviously keep pets and children away.

"But if someone still wanted me to come out and have a look around their place I'm happy to do that because it can give people some peace of mind if I've cleared the yard."

Mr Buckley said the only time someone would be bitten by a snake is if they've interfered.

"The majority of people bitten are people who have tried to capture or kill one," he said.

"The key thing to remember is to not get involved, just stay out of the snake's way."

Mr Buckley said in some cases, such as Mrs Capewell's, you can't just let the snake be.

"With the browns and even the little green trees, they get into people's houses and can't come back out because they get scared.

"In that case you just need to try and find a snake catcher who is available to come out."


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