Carl Rackemann bowls during Qld vs Vic Sheffield Shield game at /Gabba 20 Oct 1995. Cricket A/CT alone headshot sport action bowling qld
Carl Rackemann bowls during Qld vs Vic Sheffield Shield game at /Gabba 20 Oct 1995. Cricket A/CT alone headshot sport action bowling qld

The boy from Wondai who went on to play for Australia

THE boy from Wondai went on to play for Queensland and Australia, playing 12 test matches, 52 One Day Internationals and 167 first-class cricket matches.

Carl Rackemann was known for his speedy deliveries and ability to find the stumps.

He made his test debut for Australia against England in 1982 at the Gabba

Rackemann's cricket career begun playing as a junior for Wondai in the South Burnett Competition.

Rackemann said back when he was playing junior cricket the South Burnett competition was set up different to what it is now.

Rackemann took 425 wickets in his time at the Queensland Bulls. (Picture: File)
Rackemann took 425 wickets in his time at the Queensland Bulls. (Picture: File)

"When I started playing junior cricket for Wondai the competition was split into three zones, Kingaroy, Nanango and Barambah," Rackemann said.

"A few years before I was ready to start playing junior cricket, it was a Brisbane-based competition so I was very fortunate that when I started, it became more of a state-wide game.

"Each zone had a rep team who played and out of that a South Burnett team was selected."

Same as today, the South Burnett side played in a Wide Bay competition, before a Wide Bay team was selected to play in the state titles.

Rackemann made his first Wide Bay team in U13s and then continued to play in U15s and U17s.

As a junior he never made the Queensland side.

It wasn't until Rackemann moved to Brisbane to play club cricket for the 1977-78 season that he was noticed by Queensland selectors.

After playing for the Queensland Colts U23s, Rackemann played his first Sheffield Shield match for Queensland in 1979.

By 1982 Rackemann was set to make his test debut for Australia, taking on England at the Gabba.

Rackemann said it was a pretty good feeling to represent your country.

"It was pretty exciting to play for Australia and as a youngster I never thought I would make it at that level," Rackemann said.

"I think everyone as a youngster fantasises about playing for Australia, however it was a pretty good feeling when I made my debut.

"I went on to play 12 tests for Australia and 52 one day internationals."

In 1985-1987, Rackemann signed up to play in the Rebel Tours of South Africa.

The South African Rebel Tours were a series of seven tours staged between 1982 and 1990 to rebel against South Africa being banned from international cricket due to racial segregation at the time.

Rackemann, was joined by former test captain Kim Hughes, Terry Alderman, Rodney Hogg, Trevor Hohns, Tom Hogan, John Dyson and Steve Smith, with South Africa winning both test series.

After the Rebel tours, Hughes never played for Australia again, however Rackemann returned to the Australian side when he was selected for the 1989 Ashes tour of England.

Some of Rackemann's best bowling figures were delivered that year in a test against New Zealand in Perth, where he bowled 31 overs, for 23 runs and one wicket, with 21 of the over's maidens.

Cricket – Queensland cricketer Carl Rackemann bowling during training in 1992. (Picture: File)
Cricket – Queensland cricketer Carl Rackemann bowling during training in 1992. (Picture: File)

Rackemann had an outstanding career playing for Queensland and was, until recently, the leading wicket taker, taking 425 wickets, until being overtaken by Michael Kasprowicz.

In his last Sheffield Shield match for Queensland in 1994-95, Rackemann helped his side to victory, claiming their first Shield win.

In Rackemann's international career he bowled 2719 balls and took 39 wickets for an average of 29.15.

His best bowling figures were 6 for 68 and on three occasions he took three wickets.

On one occasion he demolished Pakistan taking 11 wickets in the 1983-84 season.

After his playing career, Rackemann went on to have a coaching position for the Zimbabwean national cricket team for two seasons from 2000.

Rackemann now resides back on his family farm near Wooroolin and said he still has a lot of involvement with cricket.

"I had been coaching over in Zimbabwe and really enjoying it, however it came down to I either had to commit to a future coaching cricket or do something less reliant on travelling all over the place," Rackemann said.

"I decided it was best to have a more settled life and came back to the family farm.

"I am still on the board of Cricket Queensland, am a patron for junior cricket in the South Burnett and also do a bit of work with the cricket media."

As of March this year, a junior representative shield match was named in Rackemann's honour, with the Southern Bulls playing the Northern Stars in a three match series in the South Burnett.

 

FAMILY: Carl Rackemann with his wife Lousie and their children Tom and Maddie on his farm in Kingaroy. (Picture: File)
FAMILY: Carl Rackemann with his wife Lousie and their children Tom and Maddie on his farm in Kingaroy. (Picture: File)
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