Kingaroy State High School community education councillor Toni Phillips-Petersen with student Lydia Lawton and principle Ashley Roediger at the Yarning Circle. (Picture: Tristan Evert)
Kingaroy State High School community education councillor Toni Phillips-Petersen with student Lydia Lawton and principle Ashley Roediger at the Yarning Circle. (Picture: Tristan Evert)

The Yarning Circle: Celebrating Indigenous culture at school

AS A school with 145 Indigenous students, Kingaroy State High School is developing a new project to celebrate Indigenous culture.

The Yarning Circle is a new collaboration between staff and students to create an educational and creative space for everyone to enjoy.

Kingaroy State High School community education councillor Toni Phillips-Petersen said the space will not only be great for the school, but also for the wider community.

“The Yarning Circle is all about reconciliation, it’s about gathering both black and white students and staff together to sit down and have a yarn,” Ms Phillips-Petersen said.

“It’s so important to celebrate Indigenous culture and aboriginal history and as such a multicultural school, it will be great to have a space to bring everyone together.

“So far the kids have loved it, it has been a project so many students have been involved with.

The Yarning Circle will feature a range of native plants, sandstone rocks, a mural and tables and chairs.

The Sandstone rocks are to be delivered next week and Ms Phillips-Petersen said once the stones are in the students will be able to gain a greater understanding for the project.

“It has been a pretty cool project for the school because so many of the students have been involved in the development of it,” she said.

“Once the big mural is up on the wall it will become a space where kids can enjoy the birds, celebrate the culture and sit down for a yarn.

“I am really looking forward to having it finished.”

Kingaroy State High School principle Ashley Roediger said Indigenous culture is a big part of the school.

“To be able to celebrate Indigenous culture with this new space is great for the school,” Mr Roediger said.

“It’s a way to educate both staff and students and integrate Indigenous culture into every day life at the school.

“The students have all been heavily involved with the project so it will be great to see the finished product.”

The Yarning Circle at Kingaroy State High School is expected to be complete in two weeks time.

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