Miriam Tasker with partner Campbell James at their home. Miriam says isolation due to the threat of infection following her kidney transplant is an every day worry.
Miriam Tasker with partner Campbell James at their home. Miriam says isolation due to the threat of infection following her kidney transplant is an every day worry.

‘This is our daily life’: Isolation normal for transplant patient

AS Australia prepares for a period of self-imposed isolation due to the threat of the coronavirus, for Miriam Tasker, it's an everyday occurrence.

Ms Taser received a kidney transplant more than three years, and lives each day on a regimen of immunosuppressants that make her susceptible to disease.

"I take 14 tablets in the morning, and another seven at night," she said.

"That's not including Panadol and others."

 

<< Follow this link to stay up to date with the latest coronavirus information specific to the Clarence Valley >>

 

Ms Tasker said that the attention to hygiene and social-distancing is something she lives daily.

"I avoid a lot of different things," she said. "There's a lot of public places and group events that I do avoid.

"Sometimes I get told it looks like I'm rude because I avoid situations … it's because to do it puts me at greater risk."

Even the common cold, or coughs and sneezes have severe consequences for Ms Tasker.

"Someone with a basic cold is enough to put me in hospital," she said.

"This is how transplant patients have to live, regardless if there's a virus in the community."

Ms Tasker said she thought the current coronavirus outbreak would bring awareness to the community of how simple it is to transfer bugs and virus throughout the community.

"They're everywhere, from the trolleys that don't get wiped down after every use, or the buses the kids are on - there's no way they are wiped down," she said.

And for any infection, Ms Tasker is her own last line of defence.

"It's not fun, you go somewhere like Bunnings, and you hear someone coughing, and I take a breath and walk away," she said.

The morning medications for Miriam Tasker following her kidney transplant.
The morning medications for Miriam Tasker following her kidney transplant.

 

"You feel like you're a little bit weird sometimes. I might see someone I know, but I know they're going to come and hug me, and I have to walk away because I can't cope with that exposure."

Ms Tasker said she was isolating herself as much as possible, making only short trips for the regular blood tests she needs.

"I'm staying away from any other things - I can't do markets or play music."

She said that the lack of supplies, especially toilet paper affected her current state, with the drugs she is on giving her bowel issues, with another friend with Crohn's disease suffering at the lack of supplies.

Despite her issues, Ms Tasker said her new kidney had given her back a quality of life she hadn't had while on dialysis previously.

"It's been a rock rollercoaster of a road, I'm forever grateful I had it," she said.

"But I see people panicking about what's going on, and I just look at it like it's every day.

"This is our daily life."

 


Meet the local heroes keeping South Burnett children safe

Premium Content Meet the local heroes keeping South Burnett children safe

HERE is the full list of winners and nominees for the South Burnett Child...

Third grass fire in as many days destroys shed, caravan

Premium Content Third grass fire in as many days destroys shed, caravan

EMERGENCY services have attended a third grass fire burning near Kingaroy in three...

NAMED: 44 people facing Nanango Magistrates Court

Premium Content NAMED: 44 people facing Nanango Magistrates Court

HERE is a list of everyone facing Nanango Magistrates Court today.