YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT: Gold Training's young team. From left: Joel Bevilacqua, Anna Broadaway, Amy Doran and Marnie Cruickshank on the Esplanade, Mooloolaba.
YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT: Gold Training's young team. From left: Joel Bevilacqua, Anna Broadaway, Amy Doran and Marnie Cruickshank on the Esplanade, Mooloolaba. Iain Curry

Industry representatives discuss youth employment

WITH youth unemployment on the Sunshine Coast at 14%, young job hunters face a difficult challenge.

In an effort to combat youth unemployment and streamline recruiting, a group of employers came together on Wednesday to discuss ways of helping school leavers find work.

Gold Training organised the luncheon workshop in Mooloolaba.

Aimed at ensuring Gold Training's youth training programs made school leavers truly "job ready", the luncheon involved senior representatives from the automotive, sales and insurance, local government, and hospitality industries.

Amy Doran, of Gold Training, said the luncheon saw businessmen and women discuss ways of ensuring industry's needs were reflected in job-readiness training.

SOLVING PROBLEMS: Business and local government representatives met with Gold Training staff at Augello's Ristorante and Pizzeria in Mooloolaba last Wednesday and discussed ways of ensuring youth job-readiness training met industry's needs.
SOLVING PROBLEMS: Business and local government representatives met with Gold Training staff at Augello's Ristorante and Pizzeria in Mooloolaba last Wednesday and discussed ways of ensuring youth job-readiness training met industry's needs.

"Unemployment rates are very high, (but) Gold identified we're in a great space to do something about it," she said. "Job-ready training (is) a real focus."

Ms Doran said the results of the discussions would inform Gold Training's job readiness training with a school, which would start this week.

Ken Mills Toyota owner Brett Mills said the best advice he could give job seekers of any age was to find a job they knew the would enjoy and be passionate about.

"At the end of the day, to be successful is to be in an industry for a reasonable period of time, so you can escalate through that industry," he said. 

"You can see from experience whether someone's engaged in their job or not. They want to learn and they want to know." 

The businesses' collaboration was important, said Jade Frieser, of Sustainable Partnerships Australia. 

Ms Frieser said a survey of 500 young people in the lead up to the Sunshine Coast Youth Summit in March found that unemployment affected the mental health of the Coast's youth. 

"You can see massive repercussions in mental health after that six month mark of being rejected from job interviews," she said. 

She said young people didn't always realise they could follow up an application with a phone call, and could be easily disheartened when they were knocked back from a job. 

"They might have their hopes really set on a particular job, and then they don't even get told they've been unsuccessful," she said.   

Jade's tips

  • Job hunters: stay motivated and keep trying because jobs will pop up eventually. You need to stay positive about it, because everyone is struggling at the moment. It's not just young people who are finding it hard to get work.
  • Businesses: It's important to realise young people are a long term investment. They might not have the skills or the experience but if you invest in them they're likely to stick around.

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