TYLER PURCELL: Global Queensland Junior Welterweight Champion, November 8, 2014. The 14-year-old won the title on his tenth fight from 22-fight veteran William Kwong of Deception Bay. Photo Contributed
TYLER PURCELL: Global Queensland Junior Welterweight Champion, November 8, 2014. The 14-year-old won the title on his tenth fight from 22-fight veteran William Kwong of Deception Bay. Photo Contributed Contributed

Tyler Purcell - new junior boxing champion

FOURTH generation boxer Tyler Purcell has become the Global Queensland Junior Welterweight Champion after just 10 fights.

"It was like a movie when they put my hand up," 14-year-old Tyler said.

"It goes quiet; then everyone is screaming and everyone swarms you - even people you don't know and they shake your hand."

The fit, 63kg Gayndah boxer accepted the challenge from 22-fight veteran and title-holder William Kwong, from Deception Bay, who weighed in at 63.5kg.

Last time the two met, six months ago, they drew the fight.

Describing each championship round as "the slowest two minutes ever", Tyler said William tried to knock him out in the first round.

"He, like, came in swinging to take my head off, but blew himself out," he said.

With stamina lowered, Tyler "picked him off in the second and third rounds".

"He tried intimidation - talking at me, slamming his gloves and jumping around, (but) I laughed at him."

Coach and father Nathan Purcell said the close first round led to a split points decision between the three judges.

"The first round was that close, we couldn't really tell if Tyler won that round," Purcell said.

"As the second round went on, Tyler made him miss - he picked him off and made him fight for it.

"It looked like Tyler won the second round, and he won the third round even easier.

"I teach Tyler the harder you train, the easier it is in competition."

Junior Welterweight Champion is a stellar achievement for a lad who began boxing last year for "something to do".

Tyler listed key boxing qualities as "quick on my feet; a good eye to read the punches; and try to box smart".

"In a fight, I try to work out what kind of fighter they are - whether they stand back or whether they're coming in with the punches.

"If they stand back, I throw more longer punches; if they're coming in, I shorten up punches and keep on moving away."

Being quick on his feet led Tyler to win his first North Burnett cross country title - on a wet, slippery track - earlier this year.

At the time, Tyler said his first love among sports was boxing - as it was for his father, grandfather and great-grandfather.

Tyler's great-grandfather fought in the late 1920s through to the 1940s, his grandfather Rodney Purcell, an amateur boxer, fought 312 fights, and Mr Purcell boxed from the age of 10-20.

Tyler's "big heart and determination" and ability to listen were his key strengths, Purcell said.

"He worked a lot on his footwork and jab, and he showed that in the last fight and created opportunities. He scored a lot more than in his last fights."

As Tyler has accepted an invitation to play with the Noosa Pirates Rugby League from 2015, he will continue his boxing career in Noosa under former Australian Super Middleweight Champion Israel Kani. This makes the championship bittersweet for Purcell.

If Tyler declines a re-match with William Kwong at Bribie Island on November 29, it will be the end of a two-year run in the sport for father and son.

"Me and Tyler are coming to an end," Purcell said.

"If not, we've had our last run here - and that's good enough."


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