CHEMISTRY: Street Science Jess shows the young Kingaroy crowd the different colours of a flame when different chemicals are added.
CHEMISTRY: Street Science Jess shows the young Kingaroy crowd the different colours of a flame when different chemicals are added. Jessica McGrath

WATCH: Street science show blasts into Kingaroy holidays

LEARNING did not stop during the first week of the school holidays as Street Science blasted into Kingaroy Shopping World from July 2.

Kingaroy student Mitchell Neilsen said the Street Science show was good, even though he was covered with toilet paper after he joined Street Science presenter Jess Yarrow on stage.

"The street science was fun and educational and I was TPed with toilet paper," he said.

"When she pulled out the toilet paper I thought she was going to toilet paper the audience, but when she turned towards me I realised what was going to happen."

The 11-year-old said science can be fun when it is hands-on and you are safe around chemicals, and one day he might try working with aerodynamics through flying a plane.


Street Science Jess used the experiments to teach the children the science behind making an aeroplane fly, aerodynamics and Bernoulli's Principle.

"Through Bernoulli's Principle you could see it made the toilet paper lift up really easily which is obvious to see, and that's the same principal that keeps the ball in that little space," Jess said.

The show was all about giving the students an opportunity to experience science, she said.

"I just had an audience of kids screaming how much they loved learning about science," Jess said.

Try Street Science Jess's favourite 'lava lamp' home experiment:

To build your own lava lamp you will need:

-a clean, transparent bottle or cup

-cooking oil

-water coloured with food colouring

-fizzing tablets (anything which fizzes in water)

What to do:

1. Fill your bottle with oil until it is just below 3/4 full

2. Add about 10mL of coloured water into the oil and let it settle to the bottom.

3. Drop half a fizzy tablet into the mixture and observe the reaction occurring in the bottle. The water should fizz and bubble, rise through the liquid and slowly fall back to the bottom of the container.

4. When the reaction has finished, you can add another half tablet and watch the reaction again.

What happens?

The fizzing tablet goes through a chemical reaction, introducing carbon dioxide into the water and reducing the water's density so it floats on top of the oil.

When the carbon dioxide bubbles pop, the water returns to being denser than oil and sinks to the bottom of the container.

For more experiments visit the Street Science website.

 

South Burnett

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