Picture: File
Picture: File

Why does Easter’s date change each year?

IT SURE makes booking annual leave tricky.

But religious beliefs aside, the Easter long weekend is something all of us no doubt look forward to.

Four days off, hot cross buns by the six pack and a plethora of individually wrapped chocolate is enough to put a smile on anyone’s dial.

And with Christmas holidays a distant memory and summer all but over, it’s a welcome respite from the work grind, and hopefully a distraction from the uncertain times we’re currently facing.

But unlike other holy days, the dates change, which can make it confusing to make plans.

So how is the date of Easter decided and why does it change each year?

The date is decided by a complex set of calculations based on observations of the moon.

Eastern and Western churches continue to celebrate Easter according to different calendars, although sometimes by chance the festivals coincide.

In Western Christianity, Easter Sunday must always follow the first full moon after the spring equinox.

Easter celebrates the death and resurrection of Jesus, which, according to the Bible, happened around the Jewish festival of Passover.

Passover typically begins on the night of the first full moon after the spring equinox, which signifies the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere.

The spring equinox fell on March 20 this year, and the first Full Moon fell on April 7.

This places Easter Sunday on April 12.

South Burnett

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