Ethan Rorie, pictured fishing with his mates Carson Aicken and Mat Jones on Maroochy River, said they were “eaten alive” in Bli Bli on Tuesday night. Photo: John McCutcheon
Ethan Rorie, pictured fishing with his mates Carson Aicken and Mat Jones on Maroochy River, said they were “eaten alive” in Bli Bli on Tuesday night. Photo: John McCutcheon

‘Worst I’ve seen’: Residents ‘eaten alive’ as mozzies invade

SWARMS of bloodsucking mosquitoes have invaded a Sunshine Coast suburb with families being "eaten alive" and forced to flee indoors.

Bli Bli and surrounding residents have called for increased preventive action against the plaguing mozzies, days out from the peak season.

A Sunshine Coast Council spokeswoman said five aerial control treatments have been undertaken since September last year and that a sixth was scheduled in the Maroochy River catchment for today to reduce populations.

The spokeswoman said significant rainfall totals over January and February had contributed to the mosquito numbers.

Cane farmer Troy Apps, who has lived on the Coolum side of the Maroochy River for 49 years, said pockets of "swamp" land had been hit by the pests in waves that were the "worst he's seen".

"They're thick everywhere - Valdora, Maroochy River, Bli Bli areas have become huge breeding grounds," Mr Apps said.

"Everyone is complaining about it.

"I think we've had such a long dry spell, plenty of constant heat and they can just breed quickly.

"But there's all this long grass land which used to be maintained by farmers, now owned by council who aren't maintaining it."

Bli Bli and surrounding residents have called for increased preventative action against the plaguing mozzies, days out from the peak season.
Bli Bli and surrounding residents have called for increased preventative action against the plaguing mozzies, days out from the peak season.

Ethan Rorie, who recently moved to Bli Bli from the Gold Coast, said he felt the wrath of the mozzies at night the most.

One of his friends, Mat Jones from Sydney, said he'd been "eaten alive" inside Mr Rorie's garage on Tuesday night.

"I've noticed a fair few of them around, they're bad at Yandina too," Mr Rorie said yesterday while fishing along Maroochy River.

"We've had a few bite us today, not much, but it's a lot different at night.

"Anywhere near water or the mangroves is bad."

Bli Bli United former president and senior player Charles Cook, who lives 400 metres from the fields, said it had been "pretty s---house" since the rain started.

"It was so dry for so long but within a few days that was all it took. It's been bad," Mr Cook said.

"You don't want to go outside when it's like this."

Mosquito season starts in spring each year, as temperatures warm up and humidity increases, and runs through until April, when the cooler autumn temperatures take hold.

March is considered the peak season thanks to a combination of wetter weather, water temperature and the tidal patterns.

Have you noticed an influx of mozzies in your area?

This poll ended on 27 March 2020.

Current Results

Yes, it's a nightmare.

78%

No, we never get them.

9%

I haven't noticed.

12%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

The council spokeswoman said control activities were scientifically managed to target specific areas where and when breeding was known to occur.

She said mosquito issues were emerging from all areas holding water, both public and private land.

She said council used two control products, Methoprene Prosand and Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies israelensis liquid, with about 12 treatments in total during a typical season.

"Rates of application depend on treatment areas, mosquito larval abundance and weather forecasts," the spokeswoman said.

"Each of the control products are approved and regulated by the Federal Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicine Authority.

"The products target mosquito larvae before they mature.

"Council does not spray for adult flying mosquitoes around private property.

"The control program targets mosquito breeding locations on public land and along waterways.

"The control of mosquitoes and removing or treating mosquito breeding on residential land is the responsibility of the landholder.

"Council urges residents to limit their time in mosquito-prone areas, especially around dawn and dusk, cover their skin and manage containers which can become water-filled."


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